Innovation: culture trumps artificial intelligence

Analysis

Innovation: culture trumps artificial intelligence

An organisation’s culture is a more important factor in its ability to innovate than the uptake and use of artificial intelligence, says management consultant Dr Amantha Imber.

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An organisation’s culture is a more important factor in its ability to innovate than the uptake and use of artificial intelligence, a management consultant told the recent Australasian Talent Conference.

Dr Amanda Imber, founder and CEO of Inventium, said organisations should look at scientific “things” to create a culture where innovation thrives in a sustainable, repeatable and predictable way.

She began by defining innovation as “change that adds value”. She said there were several characteristics scientifically proven to influence an organisation’s ability to innovate. Such characteristics could be grouped into four areas: “individual”, “team”, “leader and “organisation”.

Individual

Characteristics: autonomy, challenge, reward orientation.

Team

Characteristics: positive peer group support, organisational integration, intellectual stimulation.

Leader

Characteristics: positive supervisor relations, resources, top management support, goal clarity.

Organisation

Characteristics: positive interpersonal exchange, flexibility and risk-taking, quality orientation, participation.

Of these characteristics, there were five that had the most potential for effecting an innovation culture: positive interpersonal exchange, intellectual stimulation, challenge, flexibility and risk taking, and top management support.

Dr Imber noted that organisational-wide attitudes and values are the hardest to shift.

Dr Imber presented at the Australasian Talent Conference 2018 which was held in Sydney in late June. WorkplaceInfo attended as a guest.
 
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