ACCI tells employers ‘don’t be unfair to workers’

News

ACCI tells employers ‘don’t be unfair to workers’

A major business organisation has warned employers not to use ‘unfair’ practices to hire workers before Labor’s new IR system is bedded in, saying they would be ‘unproductive and in many cases illegal’.

WantToReadMore

Get unlimited access to all of our content.

A major business organisation has warned employers not to use ‘unfair’ practices to hire workers before Labor’s new IR system is bedded in, saying they would be ‘unproductive and in many cases illegal’.

Peter Hendy, Chief Executive of the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (ACCI) advised employers to ensure that employment arrangements during this period before new industrial relations laws are submitted to the federal parliament are ‘commercially driven and based on sound human resource practices that comply with existing laws’.

Hendy said that with thousands of young people looking to employers for jobs as they complete schooling or university in coming months, business-based employment decisions should not be put on the back-burner simply because new workplace laws are proposed.

Counterproductive

‘Employers are cautioned that any unfair practices would be counterproductive, and in many cases illegal,’ he said. ‘For a start, the few businesses which do not do the right thing will find it hard to attract or retain good staff.’

Hendy said that under current laws there is no ‘employer free-for-all’.

‘The law makes it illegal for employers to alter employment conditions unilaterally or for the purpose of denying exiting rights,’ he said.

Unlawful

‘The law also provides remedies against unlawful dismissals, and in medium to larger businesses, unfair dismissals, and the increased public spotlight on employer and employee behaviour is observed by the governments and politicians who make the laws.’

Hendy pointed out that there is an inspectorate, the Workplace Ombudsman, which actively administers these laws, and which has re-stated its role in the past 24 hours to crack down on employers who try to force employees onto AWAs.

New ACCI president

Meanwhile Tony Howarth AO was elected as ACCI’s new President last week.

Howarth, an independent company director, is currently chairman of Home Building Society Limited, Mermaid Marine Australia Limited and the St John of God Health Care Board.

He is also a Director of Wesfarmers Limited and AWB Limited and is a member of the Senate of the University of Western Australia and Deputy Chair of the University’s Business School. He is a former chairman of Alinta Ltd and was managing director of Challenge Bank Limited.

Howarth and ACCI congratulates Kevin Rudd and his team in winning the election and said ACCI looks forward to working with the new government. He has already written to the new Prime Minister seeking an early meeting.

Confidence in Hendy

Howarth expressed support for ACCI chief executive Peter Hendy, saying the the ACCI secretariat has ‘performed outstandingly over the last year and they have delivered what they have been asked to do by the Board’.

Hendy and the staff have the full support of the ACCI Board, he said.

There had been speculation about Hendy’s position after Rudd described him as a ‘Liberal Party operative’ during the election campaign. Hendy was previously chief of staff to former Liberal Workplace Relations Minister Peter Reith.

Ironically Rudd gave Hendy a reference when he applied for the ACCI job.
 

Related

Hendy under pressure at ACCI following Rudd win

Rudd wrote reference for anti-union business leader

 

Post details