Daylight saving 2011–12

Analysis

Daylight saving 2011–12

The commencement and cessation of daylight saving hours throughout Australia for the period 2011–12 will remain the same as last year.

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The commencement and cessation of daylight saving hours throughout Australia for the period 2011–12 will remain the same as last year.

In 2007, the respective State and Territory Governments of New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania and the Australian Capital Territory agreed to synchronise their daylight saving hours, and this arrangement will continue for the foreseeable future.

In Western Australia, a referendum was held in May 2009 to decide whether daylight saving should become permanent, following a three-year trial. The referendum rejected the continued operation of daylight saving, which reverted to Australian Western Standard Time (AWST) last year.

Earlier last year, a private member’s Bill (Daylight Saving for South East Queensland Referendum Bill 2010) was introduced into the Queensland Parliament to provide for a referendum on the question of having daylight saving in the South East Queensland daylight saving region. No referendum has occurred on this matter as yet.

Daylight saving Australia-wide 2011–12
 
Daylight saving times are as follows:
  • New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania and Australian Capital Territory: begins first Sunday in October — 2.00 am Sunday, 2 October 2011 (turn clock ahead one hour); and ends on first Sunday in April — 3.00 am Sunday, 1 April 2012 (turn clock back one hour)
  • Queensland, Western Australia and Northern Territory: these states and territory do not observe daylight saving.
Australian time zones
 
When the time is 12.00 pm AEDT in New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania and Australian Capital Territory, the following times will apply from 2.00 am AEST Sunday, 2 October 2011 to 3 am AEDT Sunday, 1 April 2011:
  • Queensland: 11.00 am
  • South Australia: 11.30 am
  • Northern Territory: 10.30 am
  • Western Australia: 9.00 am
Wage payment when clock changes
 
WorkplaceInfo receives enquiries from subscribers regarding the proper payment to an employer, such as a night-shift worker or an employee working overtime, when the clock is put forward one hour from 2.00 am to 3.00 am at the commencement of daylight saving and, likewise, when the clock is set back one from 3.00 am to 2.00 am at the end of daylight saving.

Over the years, this matter has been determined by industrial tribunals — with an employee being paid by the clock. This means that when the clock is put forward one hour, the employee actually works seven hours but is paid for eight hours. Conversely, when the clock is put back one hour, an employee works nine hours but is paid for just eight hours.

However, a common practice among employers is to have a policy of not treating an employee to their disadvantage in any way by the time changes. This approach only becomes an issue when the clock is turned back one hour at the end of daylight saving. When the employee works nine hours (but is only entitled to eight hours pay), the employer usually pays the employee nine hours pay or gives the employee one hour’s credit or, if the hours are overtime, nine hours overtime at the appropriate penalty rate. In the absence of a specific provision in the applicable industrial instrument or contract of employment, the employer is under no obligation to pay nine hours pay in this circumstance.

Overseas countries
 
For those employers with overseas business customers, or company affiliates located overseas, the following are the relevant dates regarding daylight saving in major trading areas around the world:
  • Great Britain and Northern Ireland, European Union states: daylight saving ends at 1.00 am GMT on last Sunday in October (30 October 2011), and daylight saving commences at 1.00 am GMT on last Sunday in March (25 March 2012)
  • United States and Canada: daylight saving ends at 2.00 am on first Sunday in November (6 November 2011), and commences at 2.00 am on second Sunday in March (11 March 2012)
  • New Zealand: daylight saving commences at 2.00 am on last Sunday in September (25 September 2011), and ends at 2.00 am on first Sunday in April (1 April 2012)
  • China, Japan, India and South Korea: these countries do not currently observe daylight saving time.
Source: Paul Munro, IR Consultant.
 
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