Della announces end to leave 'discrimination' for young workers

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Della announces end to leave 'discrimination' for young workers

Long service leave in NSW will soon start accumulating when someone starts work, regardless of age, the Minister for Industrial Relations, John Della Bosca, announced today.

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Long service leave in NSW will soon start accumulating when someone starts work, regardless of age, the Minister for Industrial Relations, John Della Bosca, announced today.

 

Speaking at the Labor Council of NSW’s annual conference, this year centring on Young Workers, Mr Della Bosca said the move would end discrimination which meant young workers may lose five or six years of service because under present laws it didn’t start accumulating until they were 21.

He said this would particularly impact on young workers in the retail and hospitality sectors.

The Government will also amend anomalies in the laws which let employers round down the ordinary rates of pay of young part-time and casual workers for the purposes of annual leave.

Mr Della Bosca said although the Government had introduced the Industrial Relations Amendment (Leave) Bill 2000 last year, it was intended as an exposure bill, and consultations meant revising it would take some time.

In the meantime, the Government will use this session of Parliament to fast track two separate bills to correct the anomalies which ‘discriminate against young people’.

Labor Council secretary Michael Costa told WorkplaceInfo he welcomed the announcement, as Labor Council had been campaigning for a long time to remove the ‘injustice’.

Mr Della Bosca also announced:

  • He expected to receive a final report into the state’s Labour Hire inquiry within two weeks, and would table it ‘very shortly thereafter’, probably in the first week of the session.
  • Further work on privacy would be done, with the Government targeting email, listening devices and general surveillance, as set out in the NSW Law Reform Commission’s report on privacy and electronic surveillance.
  • The Government was considering the introduction of a levy in the construction industry to train apprentices (the results depend on a feasibility study being undertaken by the Government). The feasibility of introducing such a levy into white-collar industries would also be considered.
  • The Government was ‘very carefully’ monitoring the situation as regards union fee for service (see HR Link 17/2001), and would canvass opinion on the issue amongst employers and employees. He said no such claims had been made in the State jurisdiction yet.

Michael Costa said regardless of the Government’s position on the matter of fees, the Labor Council would take the issue further. He said he thought the Australian Industrial Relations Commission had adopted a reasonable position, as the fees were service fees, not compulsory unionism.

The Labor Council was currently looking among affiliates for a possible test case.

 

 

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