IR news briefs 4/7/03

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IR news briefs 4/7/03

Childcare workers want more money; Government investigates paid work; Morris McMahon resolved; ALP demands signing of discrimination treaty; and new Federal Bill on workplace contempt.

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Childcare workers want more money; Government investigates paid work; Morris McMahon resolved; ALP demands signing of discrimination treaty; and new Federal Bill on workplace contempt.

New Child Care Services Award before AIRC

The Liquor Hospitality and Miscellaneous Workers Union (LHMWU) lodged an application with the AIRC today for a new Child Care Workers Award that would increase child care employee wage rates by between $40 to $180 per week.

According to LHMU Child Care Union National Assistant Jo-anne Schofield, 'This Award claim is critical to the survival of the sector if we are to overcome the skills shortage. Unfortunately, there is plenty of evidence that people qualify to work in the childcare sector but never work as carers because of the low wages.'

Government investigates participation in paid work

A House of Representatives Employment and Workplace Relations Committee inquiry into paid workforce participation in rural, regional, urban and outer urban areas is calling for submissions.

The inquiry will look at:

  • the aging population and the workforce;
  • average hours worked by those in paid work;
  • balancing assistance, incentives and obligations to increase the workforce participation of income support recipients.

Submissions are required by August 29.

For more detail go to the Australian Parliament House website or call (02) 62774561.

Morris McMahon dispute comes to a close

The 16-week dispute at the Morris McMahon can factory ended this week when the company and the Australian Manufacturing and Workers' Union reached a collective agreement acceptable to both parties.

According to Morris McMahon the terms of the agreement include:

  • a 4.3% pay rise in August and for the next three years;
  • a five day 38-hour week, with a one-off payment of $1,500; or
  • a five day 38-hour week for one year, followed by a 19-day month with a rostered day off.

There will also be an independent investigation into allegations against 'certain individuals'.

ALP urges Federal Government to sign CEDAW

The Howard Government must sign the United Nations Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), the ALP said this week.

'The Optional Protocol would provide an avenue for women to seek redress for discrimination and breaches of human rights where all domestic avenues of redress have been exhausted,' according to Shadow Attorney-General Robert McClelland and Shadow Minister for Foreign Affairs Kevin Rudd.

Both Shadow Ministers said that the Attorney-general and Foreign Affairs Minister's claim that the UN human rights treaty bodies have adopted reforms suggested by Australia leaves no reason not to sign the CEDAW.

Contempt Bill introduced before Federal Parliament ended last week

The Workplace Relations Amendment (Codifying Contempt Offences) Bill 2003 seek to prohibit:

  • conduct which contravenes an order of the Australian Industrial Relations Commission (AIRC);
  • publishing false misconduct allegations affecting the AIRC; and
  • inducing a person to give false evidence to the AIRC.

For detail on the Bill go to the Australian Workplace website

 

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