Building industry new code of practice

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Building industry new code of practice

A new code of practice for the NSW building industry was approved by Cabinet on 20 May 1996, and will apply to all public sector jobs tendered for after 1 July 1996.

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A new code of practice for the NSW building industry was approved by Cabinet on 20 May 1996, and will apply to all public sector jobs tendered for after 1 July 1996. Until then, the Greiner/Fahey Government’s Code of Practice and Code of Tendering will continue to apply. The Government will also launch a new Code of Tendering and Implementation Manual at the same time.

According to Government sources, the new Code of Practice is ‘built on the existing code’. It gives greater emphasis to OHS, training , enterprise bargaining, site relations and quality and, unlike the current code, allows payment into CERT. The Code of Tendering will continue the public sector’s thrust towards pre-qualifying contractors and subcontractors.

The Code of Practice will explicitly cover jobs funded by government money (coverage is ambiguous under the existing code) and the Government is looking for ways to reform practices on jobs involving private sector clients. One method may be to look at how pre-qualifying tenderers handle their operations and work on private sector jobs.

During the transition between codes, employers will have to give some thought to operating under both codes at the same time on different jobs. The Chamber will have copies of the codes and implementation manual for distribution when they are available.

Industry Green Paper

The NSW Government is also working on a green paper which will examine the opportunities and challenges for industry in the period leading up to and beyond the 2000 Olympics. Clearly, there will be a growing demand for skills and labour in the next few years, followed by a subsequent falling away of demand for major construction. The green paper will address skills and resource needs, training strategies and requirements, industrial strategies and the role and obligations of stake holders.

The draft of the green paper is expected to go before Cabinet either late this month or in early July, and to be publicly available by mid July. While green papers are intended to attract public comment and submissions, it is understood that this green paper could be provocative. For example, it is understood that the Green Paper will propose scrapping the current 1 in 4 apprenticeship ratio, and replacing it with a 20% training requirement based on the needs of the job. The Chamber will obviously be responding to the Green Paper in due course.

 

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