Beazley launches billboard campaign to oppose WorkChoices

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Beazley launches billboard campaign to oppose WorkChoices

Labor plans to set up more than 40 billboards across Australia in opposition to the Federal Government's WorkChoices laws with the message: 'These unfair laws will go'.

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Labor plans to set up more than 40 billboards across Australia in opposition to the Federal Government's WorkChoices laws with the message: 'These unfair laws will go'.

Opposition Leader Kim Beazley said at the weekend, that the first of the billboards would be in Brisbane, Townsville, the western suburbs of Sydney and in Adelaide, before spreading further around the country.

Beazley said there would be a 'stark choice' at the next election: 'Between Howard and Costello's unfair industrial relations system, extreme industrial relations system, and their wage cutting AWAs - and Labor's pledge for a fair industrial relations system, a modern, flexible one that represents true Australian values.'

'This is the ground that we're going to stand on at the next election,' Beazley said.

Offer fair deal

'We're going to offer Middle Australia a fair deal. When they put in - they'll get back. When they work hard - they'll get access to those penalty rates. When they do the right thing in the workplace - they're not going to be subject to unfair dismissal.

'Now this is where John Howard has left them. He's left Middle Australia without the sense of security that they deserve and the sense of security they need for their families.'

Asked at a press conference what words he had for the business community Beazley said: 'We're about flexibility and fairness.

'We're not about shifting the weights in one direction or another,' he said. 'We're about creating opportunity there for people to get the very best out of the Australian workforce.

Removing incentives

'The trouble is that ... John Howard's [proposals are] ... bad for the economy because all that incentive to productivity will effectively have been removed by these laws.'

He said people want to work hard but they also want a reward.

'When they put in that overtime; when they work on holidays; when they do lousy shifts, they actually want to be rewarded for it,' he said. 'And John Howard has said: "you can't be".'

Beazley said he was very satisfied with last week's Day of Action protest against the IR laws, saying it was 'difficult' for workers to come out in the middle of the day and yet tens of thousands had around the country.

'Cowardice'

He accused Howard of cowardice in that he hid his industrial relations intentions from the people at the last federal election.

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