CFMEU fined, IR reg, parental leave furore, more

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CFMEU fined, IR reg, parental leave furore, more

The CFMEU is under fire for its behaviour on work sites; a NSW IR regulation has been updated; the Australian Human Rights Commission has slammed proposed cuts to paid parental leave; a bill to reestablish the ABCC has been voted down; and an industry group claims a 'football' holiday in Victoria will hurt business.

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The CFMEU is under fire for its behaviour on work sites; a NSW IR regulation has been updated; the Australian Human Rights Commission has slammed proposed cuts to paid parental leave; a bill to reestablish the ABCC has been voted down; and an industry group claims a 'football' holiday in Victoria will hurt business.

CFMEU slugged $45K for coercion


The Federal Court has fined the CFMEU and its officials Adam Olsen and Kane Pearson a total of $45,600 after Olsen attempted to coerce a Northern Territory building company into paying union memberships on behalf of its workers. The court also found that both officials misused their right of entry permits after entering the Darwin building site on two occasions in June 2013.

Meanwhile, CFMEU NSW state secretary Brian Parker and assistant state secretary Rebel Hanlon are facing Federal Circuit Court action after they allegedly used unfounded immigration and superannuation concerns to get on site and sign up workers to the CFMEU.

"We want the Chinese to stop," Parker allegedly said about workers of Chinese origin who were employed on the site, after telling a project manager to "do what I f**king say".

FWBC is alleging that in August of last year, Hanlon attended the Ponds School project in NSW and told workers to stop work and go to the sheds.
 

NSW IR regulation updated


The NSW Industrial Relations (General) Regulation has been remade, updating the 2001 Regulation with mainly changes of a machinery nature and to harmonise with provisions of the federal Fair Work Act.

The NSW Industrial Relations (General) Regulation 2015 updates references to repealed legislation in relation to unfair dismissals, record keeping and non-industrial organisations.

It will commence on 1 September 2015.


Proposed parental leave cuts a 'breach of human rights'


The Australian Human Rights Commission has added its voice to the growing opposition to cuts to paid parental leave, arguing the cuts are a breach of human rights.

Sex discrimination commissioner Elizabeth Broderick argues the cuts would exacerbate the current gender pay gap, prove detrimental to women’s workforce participation rates and are inconsistent with Australia’s international human rights obligations.

Today’s revelations follow a report last week by the Joint Parliamentary Human Rights Committee – chaired by a Liberal – which also claimed the cuts may be a breach of international human rights conventions.

If passed, the cuts would see up to 80,000 new mothers lose part or all of their national, government funded Paid Parental Leave. 

Union welcomes ABCC decision


The CFMEU has welcomed the decision today of the Senate in the Federal Parliament to vote down the bill to reestablish the ABCC. National CFMEU construction secretary Dave Noonan said the defeat of the bill was a vote for equal rights for workers in the construction industry and a vote against discrimination.
 

Footy Friday sticks boot into business


An Australian Industry Group report released today has highlighted the negative economic impact on Victoria if plans proceed for the Friday before the AFL Grand Final to be declared a public holiday.

Ai Group Victorian director Tim Piper, said the analysis, based in part on a survey of Victorian employers, found that three quarters of local businesses would keep their doors closed on the ‘Football Friday’ holiday.

"This will come at a cost of at least $1 billion in lost sales for Victorian businesses with a $500 million dollar wage bill lumped on top," he said.  On average, businesses that will not open will lose $15,800 in sales while still having to pay $9,000 in wages.  

 

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