Delay shows WorkChoices is ‘a dog’s breakfast’, says Labor

News

Delay shows WorkChoices is ‘a dog’s breakfast’, says Labor

Labor has described the WorkChoices IR legislation as ‘a dog’s breakfast’ after the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (ACCI) admitted that the complexity of the regulations was holding up the implementation of the new laws.

WantToReadMore

Get unlimited access to all of our content.

Labor has described the WorkChoices IR legislation as ‘a dog’s breakfast’ after the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (ACCI) admitted that the complexity of the regulations was holding up the implementation of the new laws.

The introduction of WorkChoices and its regulations have been delayed several times and is now expected ‘late’ this month. It was originally expected in February, and employers have expressed their frustration over the delay.

Attack on Government

Shadow Industrial Relations Minister Stephen Smith says comments by ACCI Chief Executive Peter Hendy, that complexity was causing the delay underlines ‘just what a dog’s breakfast the Government’s legislation really is’.

Smith said Peter Hendy this week told journalists that: ‘The hold up is that regulations need to be produced...That has some degree of complexity to it, and that’s what the hold up is’.

‘On this point, Peter Hendy is absolutely right,’ Smith said. ‘The Government said that the Act would be proclaimed and regulations in place by 1 March. Now, it looks like the end of this month at the earliest.

‘There’s a simple reason for this. In its rush to get its extreme and unfair legislation through the Parliament last year, the Government created an industrial relations dog’s breakfast.

‘That’s a dog’s breakfast that will be challenged by the States in the High Court, and irrespective of that outcome we’ll see gaps in jurisdiction and incomplete coverage for Australia’s 10 million employees.

‘It will also lead to greater complexity and more confusion for business, particularly for small business.’

Attitude of business

Smith said it had cost more than $750,000 of taxpayer money, mostly spent on private legal practitioners, for the sake of putting the legislation together in a rush, with a legal mess the only result.

Smith said it was not surprising that the latest Dun and Bradstreet Business Expectations reports that 85% of Australian companies consider that the Howard Government’s industrial relations changes will not assist business growth over the next 12 months.

Related

Federal IR changes 2005/2006

 

Post details