Della Bosca joins attack on ‘radical’ Fed IR changes

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Della Bosca joins attack on ‘radical’ Fed IR changes

NSW Industrial Relations Minister, John Della Bosca, has joined the attack on the Howard Government’s planned IR changes, saying Australians don’t want conflict in the workplace and don’t want historic rights and entitlements stripped away.

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NSW Industrial Relations Minister, John Della Bosca, has joined the attack on the Howard Government’s planned IR changes, saying Australians don’t want conflict in the workplace and don’t want historic rights and entitlements stripped away.

‘The Commonwealth must start listening to the Australian people and back away from a destructive workplace agenda,’ Della Bosca said.

‘Australians did not vote for radical change: The Commonwealth’s plans were hatched after the election, when it emerged the Coalition would have absolute power in the Senate.

‘Only after the election did anyone start proposing two-weeks minimum annual leave, instant dismissal in companies with up to 100 workers or the axing of the state industrial relations safety net.’

Polls tell the story

Della Bosca said yesterday’s polls show that 60% of Australians oppose the government’s plans and the Prime Minister’s approval rating has taken its biggest plunge since 1996

‘It’s obvious why Howard didn’t consult on his plan or reveal it before the election,’ Della Bosca said.

‘The evidence is overwhelming and he cannot continue to ignore the reality.

‘To ram this legislation through the Senate, against the wishes of the majority of Australians, would be an arrogant abuse of his power and contrary to the interests of Australian families, workers, businesses and the nation’s cooperative workplace culture.’

Della Bosca said the problem is very much of Howard’s own making.

He said the Commonwealth has refused to consult with anyone, particularly avoiding the states and territories 'who have run cooperative industrial relations systems for millions of workers for over a century.’

Della Bosca said he had invited Howard to speak at a national industrial relations conference being conducted by the states and territories in Sydney on 13 July to redress this problem.

He said it was untrue that the Australian public has provided the government with a mandate for radical change in industrial relations.

‘The fact is, this was never an election issue and the Australian community was not prepared for what the Commonwealth is proposing,’ Della Bosca said.

Related

Federal IR changes 2005
 

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