Democrats push for federal gay law reform vote

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Democrats push for federal gay law reform vote

1/2004 A vote on federal sexuality discrimination and vilification Bills impacting on work and other areas is being pushed along by the Democrats.

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1/2004

 

A vote on federal sexuality discrimination and vilification Bills impacting on work and other areas is being pushed along by the Democrats.

The Democrats wrote to the ALP this week requesting support for a Senate debate and vote on their Sexuality and Gender Identification Discrimination Bill 2003 and Sexuality Anti-Vilification Bill 2003.

The Bills were introduced into Parliament in 2003, with the help of the ALP.But they stalled at the first reading stage.

Democrats’ spokesperson on sexuality, Senator Brian Greig said: ‘Now that Labor says it wants national gay law reform, same-sex partner recognition and legislation against incitement to hatred, there is no excuse for the ALP overlooking or ignoring the existing Democrats’ Bills which do precisely these things.

‘The Democrats have Private Member’s Bills on all the areas of gay law reform which have been nominated by Labor, but we have never before had major party support for a proper debate and conclusive vote on them.’

Sexuality and Gender Identification Discrimination Bill 2003

The workplace provisions of the Bill make discrimination against employees and job applicants on the grounds of sexuality, transgender identity or intersex status unlawful.

The provisions relate not just to employees or prospective employees, but also contractors, commission agents, volunteers and other work arrangements.

If the Bill is successful it will be unlawful to discriminate:

  • when offering employment;
  • in the terms and conditions of employment;
  • in the payment of superannuation;
  • in the issuing of authorisations necessary to facilitate practice of an occupation;
  • when providing employment agency services;
  • when considering applications for membership or access to benefits of registered organisations; and
  • in invitations to become a partner or in the terms of a partnership.

However, discrimination won’t be unlawful if:

  • a person recruits a worker to carryout domestic duties at their place of residence; or
  • an educational institution that operates in accordance with particular tenets, beliefs or teachings of a particular religion or creed is recruiting an employee.

Sexuality Anti-Vilification Bill 2003

The Bill makes it unlawful to publicly incite hatred, contempt or severe ridicule of a person or a group on the grounds of sexuality.

Public vilification includes any form of communication to the public, such as speaking, writing, printing, displaying notices, broadcasting, telecasting, and screening, playing tapes or other recorded material.

It also includes conduct that the public sees, such as gestures and displays on clothing, and the distribution of any matter to the public knowing that the matter promotes vilification.

Anything said or done in good faith is exempt.

WorkplaceInfo was unable to obtain a comment from the ALP.

See the Bills:

Sexuality and Gender Identity Discrimination Bill 2003

Sexuality Anti-Vilification Bill 2003

 

 

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