Govt ad spending will hit $111m, Senators told

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Govt ad spending will hit $111m, Senators told

The Federal Government has spent $4.1m on TV ads on its new AWA Fairness Test rules alone in just six days this week, and will spend a total of $111m on its current advertising campaign.

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The Federal Government has spent $4.1m on TV ads on its new AWA Fairness Test rules alone in just six days this week, and will spend a total of $111m on its current advertising campaign.

Figures releases at a Senate Estimates Committee hearing today showed that in addition to the $4.1m, the Government spent $472,195 on newspaper Fairness Test ads. Neither figure includes the cost of producing the ads and market research to target them.

It has also been revealed that the newspaper ads were funded through a Department of Workplace Relations (DEWR) advertising budget usually used for placing job ads and tenders in the classifieds section of newspapers.

Getting around accountability

Labor Senator John Faulkner said this was a 'new way to get around accountability process'. He said the breakdown of the overall $111m advertising budget 'said a lot about the Government's priorities'.

'National security advertising: $4.8m of ad placements over 16 months; workplace relations — trying to dig yourself out of a political hole — $4.1m of placements over six days,' Faulkner said.

'Hypocrisy'

However Finance Minister, Nick Minchin, hit back, saying: 'Don't give me any hypocrisy, Senator, you come from a State where your State Premier puts himself in the advertising so don't give me hypocrisy about Government advertising,' he said.

Minchin also defended the Government's spending on its industrial relations advertising campaign.

'What absolute rubbish, workplace relations affects every single Australian and they're entitled to know changes to the law,' he said.

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First the advertising, then next Monday the Fairness Test
 

 

 

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