Govt pushes on with IR change

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Govt pushes on with IR change

It contains 233 recommendations, but a spokesperson said Wright would not be immediately releasing it, as he would need time to read and digest it.

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Two pieces of industrial legislation covering registered organisations look likely to pass through the Senate this session after Labor and the Government reached agreement on a number of changes in the Lower House.

Federal parliament is back to a full business agenda today, after condolence motions yesterday for those killed in the Bali bomb blasts on the weekend, and the bills are being introduced into the Senate today.

The Workplace Relations (Registration and Accountability of Organisations) Bill and the accompanying Workplace Relations (Registration and Accountability of Organisations) (Consequential Provisions) Bill passed through the House of Representatives with amendments last month.

The bills aim to 'modernise financial and reporting requirements and improve the disclosure of financial information to the members of registered organisations and to improve the democratic control of those organisations through ensuring the better integrity of industrial elections', according to Workplace Relations Minister Tony Abbott.

Other Abbott bills making a comeback this week are the Workplace Relations Amendment (Genuine Bargaining) Bill and Workplace Relations Amendment (Fair Dismissal) Bill, which will be debated in the House on Thursday.

The genuine bargaining bill, which aims to outlaw pattern bargaining, passed through the House in June but was amended in the Senate last month, and now heads back to the House for further debate on those amendments.

The dismissal bill, which is the Government's seventh attempt to small businesses from unfair dismissal remedies, was introduced to the House last month but has not yet been debated.

Meanwhile, South Australia's IR Minister Michael Wright received a report into potential changes to the IR system, on deadline five months after the commissioning date (see 128/2002).

The report was prepared after an inquiry by former SA IRC deputy president Greg Stevens. Stevens delivered the landmark ruling in July, 2000 that casual clerks in SA should be allowed to convert to permanent status after 12 months (see 47/2000), five months before the federal decision awarding casual metalworkers the same right (see 1/2001).

It contains 233 recommendations, but a spokesperson said Wright would not be immediately releasing it, as he would need time to read and digest it.

 
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