Inquiries into 457 visas and construction industry

News

Inquiries into 457 visas and construction industry

Senate inquiries into 457 visas and legislation designed to protect witnesses in the construction industry are continuing, with limited time left to make submissions.

WantToReadMore

Get unlimited access to all of our content.

Senate inquiries into 457 visas and legislation designed to protect witnesses in the construction industry are continuing, with limited time left to make submissions.

Impact of temporary work visa programs


The Australian Labor Party has initiated a senate inquiry into 457 visas.

There was a recent independent review into the integrity of the 457 visa scheme and now the ALP has referred the matter to the Senate Employment and Education Committee for inquiry.

The terms of reference are broad reaching – considering employment conditions for Australian workers as well as temporary skilled migrants, debt bondage and sham contracting and English language requirements.

ACCI has commented that many of the areas covered by the terms of reference were addressed in the independent review into temporary work visas and the government response.

Since 2013, there have been three senate inquiries into various aspects of the temporary skills work visa scheme along with the independent review.

The closing date for submissions is 1 May 2015. Full details are on the parliamentary website.

Construction Industry Amendment (Protecting Witnesses) Bill 2015


The closing date for submissions to the Senate Education and Employment Legislation Committee Inquiry into the Construction Industry Amendment (Protecting Witnesses) Bill 2015 is 10 April 2015.

The bill proposes to amend the Fair Work (Building Industry) Act 2012 to extend the period during which the director of the Fair Work Building Industry Inspectorate can apply to a nominated Administrative Appeals Tribunal presidential member for an examination notice by a further two years – ie the bill would extend the FWBC's coercive powers for two years, beyond their current expiry at 31 May 2015.

Information about the inquiry here

Post details