IR changes: timing and priming

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IR changes: timing and priming

The Federal Government has stated its IR revolution would take three years to implement, causing widespread confusion for business.

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The Federal Government has stated its IR revolution would take three years to implement, causing widespread confusion for business. Meanwhile the ALP has attacked the appointment of a man with close links to the Liberal Party to run the Government’s IR advertising campaign.

Govt’s IR charges will take three years to implement, says media report

The Federal Government has stated that its IR revolution would take three years to implement, causing widespread confusion for business, according to a media report today.

The Financial Review says Workplace Relations Minister Kevin Andrews told Coalition MPs yesterday that small businesses would have a three year transitional period to move into the new federal system.

Andrews is also quoted as saying that during the three year period the Government expected to win the High Court challenge by the States, after which they may voluntarily cede their powers to the Commonwealth.

Andrews is also said to have told Government MPs that the new industrial relations system would ultimately be based only on the parliament’s corporations power, meaning unincorporated businesses would not be covered.

Concern expressed by business

The Financial Review claims business organisations have expressed concern that abandoning any reliance on the arbitration power would make it harder for the Government to regulate unions and compromise the operation of the AIRC.

Earlier this week the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry called for the Howard Government to introduce its national IR system through consultation with the states and not impose it through legislation, and suggested a taskforce be set up to begin the process.

Yesterday Deputy Prime Minister Mark Vaile repeated in Parliament his guarantee that under the Government’s proposed IR legislation public holidays, meal breaks and smokos would be protected as minimum conditions of employment.

Prime Minister Howard then refused to make the same guarantee, causing shadow IR spokesman Stephen Smith to say that Howard had ‘slapped down’ his deputy PM.

Related

National IR system may take 10 years to get through High Court

Howard says smoko and meal break trade-offs will continue

Liberal’s ad man will head IR campaign - ‘it’s political’ says Labor

The ALP has attacked the appointment of a man with close links to the Liberal Party to run the Government’s IR advertising campaign.

Kelvin Thomson, shadow Minister for Public Accountability, said the political nature of the Howard Government’s industrial relations advertising has been exposed by the appointment of Liberal Party political advertiser Ted Horton to run the next phase of the Government’s $20 million IR advertising campaign.

‘Horton has worked on federal Liberal campaigns since 1994-95,’ Thomson said.

‘It is quite improper to award a $20 million contract to someone with such close links to the Liberal Party.’

Thomson said the use of Liberal Party advertisers to run the Government’s industrial relations campaign is further evidence that these ads are political ads.

‘They are political propaganda, not community information,’ he said.

‘These are ads being prepared by Liberal Party advertisers, for the benefit of the Liberal Party and it is the Liberal Party, not taxpayers, who should be paying for them.’

Thomson said a Labor Government would ban taxpayers paying for advertisements concerning programs or issues which are yet to receive Parliamentary approval.

Related

ACTU begins TV ad attack on IR reforms

 

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