IR policies compared - from Left and Right perspectives

News

IR policies compared - from Left and Right perspectives

A major employers' organisation and a leading trade union have compared Labor's and the Federal Government's IR policies - and there are no prizes for guessing which one each prefers.

WantToReadMore

Get unlimited access to all of our content.

A major employers' organisation and a leading trade union have compared Labor's and the Federal Government's IR policies - and there are no prizes for guessing which one each prefers.

Negative effect

The Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (ACCI) has welcomed some aspects of Labor's policy - such as the retention of existing laws concerning secondary boycotts - but in most areas its analysis concludes that 'the ALP policy would, over time, have a significant negative effect on business and thereby jobs and productivity'.

The ACCI Policy Snapshot covers 20 topics plus transitional issues, and concludes that the implementation measures announced by the ALP last week did not vary the ALP's April 2007 policy in a significant way.

Too much power to employers

The CPSU has conducted a less ambitious comparison, but unsurprisingly comes down on the side of Labor.

'The Government's laws are unbalanced and give employers too much power,' the CPSU claims. 'With the release of Labor's IR policy we now have a clear alternative to the current system.'

The CPSU welcomes the return of unfair dismissal coverage for the majority of employers and the Fair Work Australia 'one stop shop' industrial umpire.

It also prefers Labor's 10 national employment standards safety net to the Government's new fairness test.

Related

Business won't like our IR laws, says Gillard

ACCI compares IR policies - and prefers Howard's


 

Post details