Mining lobby claims credit for WorkChoices reforms

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Mining lobby claims credit for WorkChoices reforms

The Australian Mines and Metals Association (AMMA) claims that some of the major reforms contained in the federal WorkChoices legislation are the result of its lobbying over many years.

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The Australian Mines and Metals Association (AMMA) claims that some of the major reforms contained in the federal WorkChoices legislation are the result of its lobbying over many years.

The AMMA has stated that the Federal Governments legislative reform package announced on 9 October 2005 (WorkChoices) closely aligns with AMMA's public position that was put to the Federal Government in March 2005.  A media release noted:  

'The fact is that many of the evolutionary reforms announced by the Federal Government have been sought by AMMA for several years, indeed in some instances decades. ...' 

Submission to Senate inquiry

The AMMAs submission  to the current Senate inquiry provides support for the general direction of the WorkChoices package and also identifies some key areas for improvement '. For example it calls for five year union greenfield agreements, recognition of common law contracts, internal regulation and a range of other specified improvement areas.

Effective lobbying

The AMMA claims that many of the evolutionary reforms announced by the Federal Government have been sought by AMMA for several years, indeed in some instances decades.

For example: 

  1. 'Reducing reliance on industrial tribunals  -  Sought by AMMA in AMMA The Way Ahead in 1988.
  2. Moving to a single national IR system  - Sought by AMMA in its publication The Case for Ongoing Reform of Workplace Relations in Australia in 1999 and AMMAs submission to the Senate Inquiry into More Jobs Better Pay Bill in 1999, also implicit in 1 above .
  3. Addressing compliance matters such as tightening up Section 127  WRA  - Sought by AMMA in a Senate Inquiry in 1999.
  4. Opposing action that limits access to civil and common law action such as removing Section 166A  WRA - AMMA The Way Ahead in 1988 and a Senate Inquiry in 1999.
  5. Calls to simplify agreement making  - Sought in AMMAs publication Beyond Enterprise Bargaining in 1999 and to a Senate Inquiry in the same year.
  6. Formal recognition of common law contracts  - Sought in What if AWAs Cease to Exist paper in 2004.
  7. The capacity for 5 year workplace agreements  - Sought in January 2003 in AMMA submission to the then Workplace Relations Minister the Hon Tony Abbott.
  8. Having the capacity for AWAs to override collective agreements Included AMMAs 10 March 2005 position paper  ...'

AMMAs most recent submission on Workplace Relations matters relates to the current Senate Inquiry into the WorkChoices Bill that passed the House of Representatives. This detailed submission can be accessed on the AMMA website

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