Moving to Labor’s IR scheme ‘not easy’, say recruiters

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Moving to Labor’s IR scheme ‘not easy’, say recruiters

Just one in ten recruitment professionals think the transition to Labor’s Forward with Fairness regime will be easy, according to an industry survey.

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Just one in ten recruitment professionals think the transition to Labor’s Forward with Fairness regime will be easy, according to an industry survey.

The survey found 56% are undecided and one-third of respondents don’t think it will be easy at all.
The Recruitment & Consulting Services Association (RCSA) publication Quarterly Member Research shows the industry appears united on the issue of individual contracts.

United on contracts

The vast majority of respondents (95%) believe that employers have the right to amend award terms and conditions using an individual contract under the law, provided employees agree and/or are not disadvantaged.

A positive sign for the recruitment sector is that staff turnover has fallen to 28% — a dip of 5 percentage points.

‘From a peak of 41% at the end of 2006, staff turnover seems to be easing,’ said Julie Mills, CEO of the RCSA.

‘There’s no doubt that this is still a high figure, but given the shortage of skilled recruiters coupled with a booming industry in recent years, it’s hardly surprising: there are just so many opportunities to move onwards and upwards.’

In line with recent reports that building approvals have declined, the survey’s skills shortage list found that building skills have dropped in demand to number four and five in the Top Ten. The top three roles with the biggest shortages are non-building professional engineers, business professionals and engineering associates & technicians.

Top-10 list of skills shortages

Demonstrating the breadth of roles that recruiters are having trouble filling, the Top-10 list reveals trades, health professionals, nurses, receptionists and telephonists remain in short supply.

Nationally, the Top Ten Skills Shortages are:

  1. Non-building professional engineers
  2. Business professionals
  3. Non-building engineering associates and technicians
  4. Building professionals
  5. Building associates and technicians
  6. Non-building electrical/electronic trades
  7. Health professionals
  8. Electrical trades (building)
  9. Receptionists and telephonists
  10. IT and telecommunications professionals

Mills said the RCSA is working to address the shortage of recruitment professionals, with the launch of the first online recruitment induction program last month, which is designed to both attract and skill those considering a move into the industry.


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