What do HR practitioners really think of WorkChoices - major study announced

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What do HR practitioners really think of WorkChoices - major study announced

How have HR practitioners responded to WorkChoices? What changes have they made to their organisations as a result of it? Is it achieving the benefits the Federal Government has claimed for it?

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How have HR practitioners responded to WorkChoices? What changes have they made to their organisations as a result of it? Is it achieving the benefits the Federal Government has claimed for it?

The Australian Human Resources Institute (AHRI) recently announced that it will undertake an extensive survey of its 11,000 members to try to find out the answers to these questions.

How the survey will work

The survey will commence in March 2007 and results will be released in four stages over about two years. The first results are due in June 2007. AHRI commissioned the survey, titled WorkChoices: Its Impact Within Australian Workplaces, in partnership with Deakin University and law firm Blake Dawson Waldron.

AHRI members will receive an initial online or mail survey in March. Questionnaires, interviews and focus groups follow later in the year and again in 2008 to discover what sort of impact the legislation is having on business, and whether that impact is changing over time. Overall, four surveys will be conducted and four sets of results released over a two-year period.

Why do it?

AHRI claims that its large database of HR practitioners are uniquely positioned to provide first-hand feedback on how WorkChoices actually affects businesses in practical terms.

In particular, the survey can indicate the extent to which parts of the legislation are being taken up in workplaces, the extent to which its take-up is contributing to positive business outcomes, and whether it is achieving the workplace benefits claimed by the Federal Government.

Whereas employer associations and unions have provided regular feedback on how WorkChoices is affecting their own members, it is claimed that HR practitioners are individuals who don't have to represent vested interests, and they can therefore provide direct and independent 'coal face' feedback on practical issues.

AHRI apparently intends to make the various results of the survey publicly available, not just to members only.

Further information

For further information see the AHRI website.

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