WorkChoices 'dead in the water' says rights charter editor

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WorkChoices 'dead in the water' says rights charter editor

A major employers' organisation and a leading trade union have compared Labor's and the Federal Government's IR policies - and there are no prizes for guessing which one each prefers.

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A major employers' organisation and a leading trade union have compared Labor's and the Federal Government's IR policies - and there are no prizes for guessing which one each prefers.

Speaking at the charter's launch yesterday in Melbourne, labour law specialist, Victorian QC and President of the Australian Institute of Employment Rights, Mordy Bromberg, said the main reason that the legislation was doomed was because most employers did not call for it, want to treat their workers fairly and are put off by its complexity.

'Additionally, the Australian public will not accept a system which it regards as unfair,' Bromberg said.

WorkChoices 'not a fair go'

'The Australian ethos of a fair go all-round will not tolerate WorkChoices. The debate now needs to shift to the post-WorkChoices solution.'

Bromberg said the Charter, developed by the Institute, was a back-to-basics attempt to define the rights of workers and employers.

'It is a simply expressed contemporary document that draws upon a range of international as well as uniquely Australian sources to create a template of rights and obligations which all workplaces are encouraged to adopt and observe,' he said.

Departure from confrontation

'[It] provides a compelling departure point from centuries-old confrontation practices in workplaces - it seeks to foster respect by both employers and workers for the legitimate rights and expectations of each other.'

The book was launched by Labor's IR spokeswoman, Julia Gillard, who made it clear that 'the authors have their own views which are different from mine and different from Labor's'. 

However, she said the charter was a valuable contribution to open debate about workplace relations. 

The Charter

A summary of the Charter.

Related 

Can your work choices include opting out of WorkChoices? 

 

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