Tasmania follows NSW lead on pay equity

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Tasmania follows NSW lead on pay equity

Tasmania’s women workers could soon have legal routes to pay equity, with the Tasmanian Industrial Relations Commission expected to establish an equal remuneration principle as part of its wage fixing principles.

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Tasmania’s women workers could soon have legal routes to pay equity, with the Tasmanian Industrial Relations Commission expected to establish an equal remuneration principle as part of its wage fixing principles.

Government, employers and unions will make final submissions on 21 June, with a decision expected by the end of the month, as two members of the bench hearing the case – President Fred Westwood and Deputy President Bevan Johnson – are retiring then.

The equal remuneration principle would give parties a mechanism by which to bring on specific cases. Employers involved in the wage fixing principle have opposed its establishment.

The employers, along with unions and government members, are also part of the Women and Paid Work Taskforce, created by Tasmanian Labor Premier Jim Bacon. The Taskforce is to make a series of recommendations under its two working parties to address the issues of pay inequity.

One term of reference was for the Taskforce to examine the findings of the NSW pay equity inquiry handed down in December 1998, and to identify issues relevant to Tasmanians and make any recommendations arising. The chair of that branch of the Taskforce is federal and state industrial relations commissioner Pat Leary.

The other arm, headed by Dr Jim Garnham, the head of the University of Tasmania’s School of Management, is to identify elements of workplace culture that make it hard to implement diversity.

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