WA puts knife into national IR system

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WA puts knife into national IR system

WA is planning to overhaul its IR laws, but new Treasurer says this will not include joining the national system proposed by the Federal Labor Government.

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WA is planning to overhaul its IR laws, but new Treasurer says this will not include joining the national system proposed by the Federal Labor Government.
 
WA Treasurer Troy Buswell told the annual convention of the Industrial Relations Society of WA he planned to remove what he described as ‘the red tape and bureaucracy’ that made the State’s current workplace laws ‘slow and unreasonable'.
 
Buswell said he was not advocating massive change.
 
No radical overhaul
 
‘I’m not advocating a radical overhaul, rather, a sensible and balanced approach to delivering better outcomes here in Western Australia,’ he said.
 
A meeting of Federal and State IR Ministers this month agreed that the new IR laws proposed by the Federal Government formed the ‘basis’ for a new national Workplace relations system.
 
A communiqué released after the meeting said in part:

‘Ministers acknowledged the draft legislation as providing the foundation for a national workplace relations system for the private sector based on Forward with Fairness. To that end, Ministers agreed that senior officials from all jurisdictions would meet further to discuss matters concerning the transition to a new national workplace relations system for the private sector, in particular issues relating to governance and service delivery including compliance and tribunals.’

Stay independent
 
However, Buswell now says that while the Commonwealth preferred the concept of a national industrial relations system, he will stick to an independent system.
 
He said the WA industrial relations system had suffered since the (then Liberal) Federal Government took steps to incorporate major companies within federal laws in 2006.
 
Labor Party MP, and former Mining Minister, Fran Logan said the government should support a national industrial relations system.
 
He said Buswell says he doesn't want Western Australia to join a national scheme because it has a constitutional right to administer its own scheme.
 
Logan said there should not be two systems in the one country and Buswell should sign up.
 
‘Driven by ideology’
 
‘His unwillingness is driven both by internal party politics, but more importantly, by the ideology of the Liberal party which is anti-union and it's anti-worker,’ he said.
 
‘We've seen that before here in Western Australia and now, out it emerges once again,’ Logan concluded.
 
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