Tristar still faces prosecution despite payout

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Tristar still faces prosecution despite payout

The Tristar car parts company has finally paid out all its redundant workforce, but will still face prosecution by the Workplace Ombudsman.

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The Tristar car parts company has finally paid out all its redundant workforce, but will still face prosecution by the Workplace Ombudsman.

Three workers at the Marrickville plant paid out yesterday and the last remaining manufacturing employee is set to leave on 30 November.

Taken its toll on health

NSW AMWU Branch Secretary, Paul Bastian said the dispute had taken its toll on the health of the employees and their families, and that could never be repaid.

He said that by any definition the workers at Tristar were redundant more than 12 months ago and should have received their full entitlements.

NSW Minister for Industrial Relations, John Della Bosca, said today the Howard Government should hang its head in shame for its role in the Tristar redundancy debacle which dragged on for more than 18 months.

Prolonged stress

'I am delighted these workers can now get their lives back on track - but the prolonged stress and anxiety endured by them and their families is a disgrace,' he said. 'John Howard, Peter Costello and Joe Hockey must be held accountable for the suffering experienced by these workers - under WorkChoices, the Commonwealth was unable to ensure a speedy and fair resolution to this dispute.'

Della Bosca said Workplace Relations Minister, Joe Hockey's attempts to take credit for the resolution are 'a joke'.

Prosecution continues: Ombudsman

Despite the payouts, Ombudsman, Nicholas Wilson confirmed that that the Federal workplace watchdog's prosecution of Tristar Steering and Suspension Pty Ltd (Tristar) will continue in the Federal Court of Australia over the company's alleged serious breaches of the Workplace Relations Act 1996.

Serious contravention

'While we are extremely pleased for the workers that Tristar has finally paid their full redundancy entitlements, the Federal Workplace Ombudsman is prosecuting Tristar because we allege that they have seriously contravened the workplace laws of this country and these late payments in no way changes that,' Wilson said. 'The Australian community is entitled to expect that employers will comply with workplace law in their relationships with their workers and the Federal Workplace Ombudsman will continue to enforce compliance with community expectations and the law.'

Avoid redundancy payouts

Tristar was accused of keeping its workforce sitting in its Sydney plant with nothing to do in an attempt to avoid large payments until the redundancy agreement ran out. Many of the employees had been with the company for more than 30 years.

The next hearing date will be on 5 February 2008 in the Federal Court of Australia in Sydney.

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