Union protests as 380 Bosch auto jobs go overseas

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Union protests as 380 Bosch auto jobs go overseas

The AMWU is meeting with Bosch management in Australia in a bid to save 380 jobs at the Clayton plant, but prospects do not look good.

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The AMWU is meeting with Bosch management in Australia in a bid to save 380 jobs at the Clayton (Victoria) plant, but prospects do not look good.
 
Bosch plans to retrench the auto-component workers and move production offshore.
 
The AMWU Victorian secretary, Steve Dargavel, said the workers had endured a 20-month pay freeze to support the company through the GFC, during which time Bosch increased its global sales by 24% to an all time high.
 
Dargavel said that to add insult to injury, Bosch had not lost contracts but simply transferred the work overseas.
 
The company claims plant is no longer sufficiently competitive, yet the AMWU insists the company did not make contact at any stage to investigate whether productivity or competitiveness could be improved.
 
Pay freeze
 
‘Clearly companies do not reward workers who endure pay freezes and show loyalty. Wages were not a factor in this decision and in fact, Bosch is investing in other sites around the world where earnings are higher,’ Dargavel said.
 
‘Had we known there were issues of concern and the possibility of job losses coming, it may have been possible for the workers and the company to reach an agreement on improvements to those issues.’
 
‘However, when a company decides to inform the workers and their representatives of job losses through the media, then you have to question whether they really did want to engage in a meaningful way and try to save Australian jobs.’
 
‘We will argue for the company to reverse its decision. We also want the federal government to use their influence to reverse this disgraceful kick in the guts.’
 
A Bosch spokesman said competitive pressures are such that approaching the government for help on the matter wouldn’t be appropriate.
 
Print workers save redundancy pay
 
Meanwhile, AMWU printing division members at Rural Press in regional New South Wales and Victoria have withstood moves to cut back their long-standing redundancy entitlements.
 
The AMWU Print Division national secretary, Lorraine Cassin, who celebrated the result at Wagga’s Daily Advertiser last week, said the workers refused to be pushed by Rural Press into a significantly weakened agreement.
 
‘They wanted to know that if they were made redundant, years of loyal service would count for something,’ she said.
 
Under the agreement proposed by Rural Press, a cap was to be introduced on the number of weeks workers could accrue redundancy entitlements. Many would have had their entitlements significantly reduced.
 
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