Victorian men more insecure than women about their jobs

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Victorian men more insecure than women about their jobs

A greater proportion of Victorian men with and without dependant children are insecure about their future at their workplace than women.

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A greater proportion of Victorian men with and without dependant children are insecure about their future at their workplace than women.

Some 26.7% of men with dependant children reported being insecure about their future at their workplace compared with 19.6% of women with dependent children.

A similar pattern existed for men and women without dependent children, where 18.6% of men compared with 14.6% of women reported being insecure.

The figures were part of a recent Victorian study 'The Challenge of Balancing Work and Family responsibilities - Work and Family Issues for the Victorian Workforce'.

Men with preschoolers

More men with preschool aged children felt insecure about their future at their workplace than any other group of men or women with or without dependent children.

Some 27.8% of men with preschool aged children were insecure compared with 19.6% of women with preschool children.

Men without preschool children who reported being insecure about their future at their workplace also presented in higher numbers than their female counterparts.

Some 20.9% of men were insecure compared with 16.6% of women.

Reversal of fortune

But while significant percentages of men and women reported being insecure about their future at their workplace, higher percentages of men and women agreed there were good chances to get ahead in their organisation. 

However, when it came to the gender split, this time the tables were reversed. Less women than men reported there were good chances to get ahead in their organisation.

Some 43.5% of men with dependant children thought they had a good chance of getting ahead in their organisation compared with 34.1% of women with dependent children.

While 49.5% of men without dependent children thought their chances were good, compared with 40.9% of women without dependent children.

The same turn around was also evident with men and women with preschool aged children.

Some 55.4% of men with preschool aged children said there was a good chance they would get ahead in their organisation, compared with 42.6% of women.

Men and women without preschool children exhibited a similar pattern, where 45.3% of men felt their chances were good, compared with 37.5% of women.

Interestingly, men with preschool aged children scored just over 10 percentage points higher when asked about their chances of getting ahead, than men without preschool children.

The study put this down to men with preschool aged children being at an age in their careers where they were likely to have more promotional opportunities.

For more information see: 'The Challenge of Balancing Work and Family responsibilities'.

Also see: Hospitality mums and dads less likely to get baby leave: Vic 

 
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